Videos and Resources

These video resources are freely available on YouTube and may be used in presentations and to support multiagency learning as needed.

Oxfordshire Child Neglect Learning Videos

Effectively tackling neglect requires curiosity, persistence, determination and a focus on the lived experience of the child. In this 17-minute video, Oxfordshire professionals discuss the impact and effects of neglect and talk about how to bring it to light and successfully support the child. This video is also available in topic chunks.

  1. Introduction to Neglect: This 1.5-minute video provides a brief introduction to neglect, explaining its importance and the role of the practitioner in supporting the child.
  2. Identifying neglect: This 5.5-minute video supports practitioners to successfully identify and evidence neglect
  3. Disabled Children and Neglect: This 2.5-minute video highlights risk of neglect to children who are disabled
  4. Supervision: This 3.5-minute video explores the importance of supervision in identifying neglect.
  5. Tools and resources: This 4.5-minute video lists key tools and resources for working with families where neglect is a concern.

LSCB Neglect

Michelle’s Story is a 15-minute animation tells the story of Michelle and her experience of neglect as she was growing up.

Rethinking Did Not Attend

Rethinking DNA is a two-minute animation and was created to encourage practitioners to identify children as ‘Was Not Brought’ instead of ‘Did Not Attend’ when they miss appointments. Although aimed at medical professionals, this principle applies for all appointments, including attendance at school.

NHS Nottingham City CCG have commissioned a video animation called Missing Appointments Matter which is aimed at raising awareness about the consequences of missing appointments and to ensure that children and adults get the medical care that they need. A subtitled version of the video is also available here.

The animation is a follow-on from the ‘Rethinking Did Not Attend’ video which acted as a powerful reminder that children do not take themselves to appointments, and for practitioners to reflect on the impact of missed appointments on a child’s wellbeing.